lucasgnovy

Lucas G G من عند Kalwara, Bihar, الهند من عند Kalwara, Bihar, الهند

قارئ Lucas G G من عند Kalwara, Bihar, الهند

Lucas G G من عند Kalwara, Bihar, الهند

lucasgnovy

إن القصة القصيرة الأولى في الكتاب ، وهي "مسألة مؤقتة" ، مبنية بشكل جميل للغاية وأخبرتها أنني وجدت نفسي أريد ذلك مرة أخرى في بقية القصص. كانت جيدة ولكن ليس مثل الأول. لا يزال ، أود أن أوصي هذا الكتاب من القصص القصيرة. أود قراءتها مرة أخرى عندما لا أحاول الضغط عليها بين قراءات الفصل.

lucasgnovy

I was very excited to see this book, as it asks a lot of very important questions, looking at the implementation of technology in schools through concepts of power, politics, equality, social justice, etc. Selwyn challenges the tacit view that somehow digital technology lies in some rarified space outside of society, culture and politics and, with this neutrality, can be transformative of education. This is an important challenge, as digital technology is a cultural artefact, designed, developed, sold and implemented in particular sociocultural contexts, which reflect and recreate certain power dynamics. It is only in teasing those out into the open that the failure of the promise of digital technology in schools can start to be dealt with. Selwyn wants to tease out those dynamics in the "messy reality" of compulsory education within various contexts such as the lived experiences of teachers and pupils, policy making, school organizational concerns, public v private trends etc. He attempts to make the case that whatever the intentions of the those implementing digital technology in schools, in practice, the variety of power/political and social agendas stymie the potential. My only personal frustrations with the book is that he seems to think that these are the only reasons for the failure of technology implementations. Sometimes it can be (at least partly and not particularly sociologically interesting), bad implementation, bad project management, bad purchasing. I get the impression the schools and teachers can do no wrong. Even stranger for me (I've not read Selwyn before), is that he starts the book saying, "I'm not anti Tech. Honest Guv!" (not a direct quote!)He seems to have been criticised for being a Luddite. However, it is hard to see a positive view of technology in his book. It feels like his fundamental position is that most tech comes from private capital, which is only there for itself, embedding and recreating its own position. His only major positive view is around the use of open source, which in my opinion in weakly argued. (Will be interesting to hear other views).